The Megalomaniac Pleasure of Creation

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I had the great pleasure today of finding the below blog post on Guy Kawasaki’s weblog.  It’s a post that resonates extremely well with me and, based on the number of people that responded to it on Guy’s blog, touched a lot of other people as well.  I actually first found it at Digital Media Wire, which is one of the few websites focused on digital media news these days that focuses more on news and less on editorial–while still nicely incorporating opinions and perspectives in to the mix occasionally. 

This posting is from a gent named Glen Kelman, who is the CEO of Redfin up here in Seattle.  It’s a company doing increasingly well in online real estate and one that has been consistenly well regarded in the tech start-up space in Seattle for the last couple years.  Without further ado…

http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2007/08/on-the-other-ha.html

Here is some of the piece also directly posted here.  Enjoy:

Last month, Guy called James Hong and Markus Frind heroes for running multi-million dollar websites like Hot or Not and Plenty of Fish in their underwear. Their stats are jaw-dropping: twelve billion page views, 380 hits per second, two hours of work a day.

Lately I’ve been thinking how hard, not how easy, it is to build a new company. Hard has gone out of fashion. Like college students bragging about how they barely studied, start-ups today take care to project a sense of ease. Wherever I’ve worked, we’ve secretly felt just the opposite. We’re assailed by doubts, mortified by our own shortcomings, surrounded by freaks, testy over silly details. Trying to be like James or Markus has only been counterproductive.

And now, having been through a few startups, I’m not even sure I’d want it to be that easy. Working two hours a day on my own wasn’t my goal when I came to Silicon Valley. Does anybody remember the old video of Steve Jobs launching the Mac? He had tears in his eyes. And even though Jobs is Jobs and I am nobody, I knew how he felt. I’d had the same reaction–absurdly–to portal software and more recently to a Redfin, a fledgling real estate website.

“The megalomaniac pleasure of creation,” the psychoanalyst Edmund Berger wrote, “produces a type of elation which cannot be compared with that experienced by other mortals.” Jobs wasn’t just crying from simple happiness but from all the tinkering, kvetching, nitpicking, wholesale reworking, and spasms of self-loathing that go into a beautiful product. It was all being paid back in a rush.

Like the souls in Dostoevsky who are admitted to heaven because they never thought themselves worthy of it, successful entrepreneurs can’t be convinced that any other startup has their troubles, because they constantly compare the triumphant launch parties and revisionist histories of successful companies to their own daily struggles. Just so you know you’re not alone, here’s a top-ten list of the ways a startup can feel deeply screwed up without really being that screwed up at all.

  1. True believers go nuts at the slightest provocation. The best people at a start-up care too much. They stay up late writing Jerry Maguire memos, eavesdropping on support calls, snapping at bureaucracy, citing Joel Spolsky on Aerons, and Paul Graham on cubes. They are your heart and bones, so you have to give them what they need, which is a lot. The only way to get them on your side is to put them in charge.
  2. Big projects attract good people. If you aren’t doing something worthwhile, you can’t get anyone worthwhile to work on it. I often think about what Ezra Pound once said of his epic poem, that “if it’s a failure, it’s a failure worth all the successes of its age.” We’re not writing poetry, but it matters to us that we’re trying to compete with real estate agents rather than just running their ads. You need a big mission to recruit people who care about what you’re doing.
  3. Start-ups are freak-catchers. You have to be fundamentally unhappy with the way things are to leave Microsoft, and yet unrealistic enough to believe the world can change to join a start-up. This is a volatile combination which can result in group mood swings and a somewhat motley crew. Thus, don’t worry if your start-up seems to have more than its fair share of oddballs.
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1 Comment

Filed under Entreprenuerialism, Management, Tech

One response to “The Megalomaniac Pleasure of Creation

  1. Wow — this is awesome — I’m learning oh so well how hard it is to make it all work in a start-up environment. Nothing is easy. Everything has 47 details that could make it fail. The key is to find other people who care just as much, if not more. Then, give them what they need to be stellar. OK… I’m going to try get a good night’s sleep before the madness begins anew 🙂

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